Multiple myeloma pain management

Get help for pain management.

Many people with multiple myeloma experience pain. Talk to your doctor about any pain that has. Together, the members of your health care team design a personalized plan to control her pain. The commonly prescribed drugs to treat pain include bisphosphonates, painkillers such as codeine or morphine, and others. Do not take over-the-counter medications without talking to your doctor.

Pain control

Pain is one of the most common symptoms of patients diagnosed with myeloma and is usually associated with an underlying bone disease. The effective management of the pain suffered by the patient and its relationship with the quality of life is as important as treatment and critical to combat myeloma in itself.

The pain is very particular in each patient and his treatment will vary, so the analgesic medication should point to a relief continued pain whenever possible with the least number of side effects associated with those drugs. In some cases patients certain benefits have been obtained using complementary therapies such as relaxation techniques, aromatherapy and even hypnosis.

In some more complicated cases medication and complementary therapies will have to be supported by other types of treatment such as:

• Localized radiation of low intensity: this has shown benefits in control of “hot spots” of active bone disease and pain.

• Percutaneous Vertebroplasty: compression fractures can be frequently used in cases of myeloma. Vertebroplasty is a procedure that involves the injection of cement on the inside of a vertebra; It has shown a significant reduction in pain.

• Kyphoplasty: It is similar to percutaneous vertebroplasty but it involves insertion of a small inflatable balloon into the vertebral body to restore the vertebral height before injecting cement. This procedure has also shown a significant decrease in pain.

Multiple myeloma is a cancer of the plasma cells that are found in the bone marrow, the spongy tissue that is inside the bones. In the early stages of the disease, it could be that patients do not experience symptoms and only require a close monitoring of their doctors. For those who experience symptoms, there are many treatment options. Has he been diagnosed with multiple myeloma? This fact sheet provides tips to deal with their diagnosis.

Some tips for coping with a diagnosis of multiple myeloma are:

  • Communicate with your health care team.

It is important to stay in close contact with your health care team not subject to ask him questions. Of them work is to provide the best care and support possible. Before the appointments, record any matter coming to mind. Then, select the most important questions so you can get the answers to those where your doctor does not have sufficient time to respond to all.

  • Learn more about multiple myeloma.

There are many sources of information available to you. Know about the different treatment options for multiple myeloma, such as targeted treatments, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and stem cell transplants, can help you feel more informed and prepared.

  • Get help for side effects.

Combination treatments, including Thalidomide (Thalomid), lenalidomide (Revlimid) and bortezomib (Velcade) have proven their effectiveness in the treatment of multiple myeloma. However, these treatments can cause side effects such as clots, low counts of blood cells, fatigue, or peripheral neuropathy (sensations of cramps, weakness, or numbness, usually on the hands and feet). Tell your doctor if you feel any side effects to treat it.

  • Take care of your bones.

Multiple myeloma can weaken your bones and put them at risk for fracture. Your doctor may prescribe bisphosphonates such as acid Zoledronic (Zometa) or disodium pamidronate (Aredia) to strengthen bones. Light exercises can also help maintain bone strength. Talk to your doctor about the type of exercise most suitable for you.

  • Get help for pain management.

Many people with multiple myeloma experience pain. Talk to your doctor about any pain that has. Together, the members of your health care team design a personalized plan to control her pain. The commonly prescribed drugs to treat pain include bisphosphonates, painkillers such as codeine or morphine, and others. Do not take over-the-counter medications without talking to your doctor.

  • Learn to relax the mind and body.

The relaxation techniques like deep breathing and meditation can help to calm the mind, reduce stress, and maintain the inner peace. For example, do not try breathing deep if you feel anxious before your next medical appointment? Some treatment centers have programs to train to cancer patients and their caregivers in the basic principles of relaxation or meditation. Your nurse or social worker may be familiar with these practices, or may refer you to others who teach these techniques.

  • Express your feelings and get help to manage difficult emotions.

A cancer diagnosis can make you feel sad or overwhelmed. Many people find that keeping a diary can help them to let off steam. Some also express themselves through art, drawing, writing, or playing music. Share their feelings with people nearby can also bring relief. If you need additional help, consult a professional such as a social worker or psychologist, or participating in a support group can offer you a safe place to explore their feelings and learn new ways to deal with your situation.